Excessive weight can be hard to treat heart failure

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Cardiac failure

Excessive weight can increase the risk of heart failure. Lack of exercise to maintain fit body can be challenging to treat cardiac disease.

Cardiac failure is a chronic condition when the heart is not able to supply sufficient oxygenated blood to fulfil the requirement of the body.

Previous studies have consistently found an association between low level of physical activity, high BMI, and overall risk of heart failure,” stated Berry, associate professor at UT Southwestern Medical Centre of the US.

“The study shows that the association is more pronounced for heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, the type of heart failure that is the most challenging to treat,” he added.

In cardiac failure with preserved ejection fraction, the heart gets stiffens. Instead of being so soft, it gets rigid and the expansion gets resist.

There are two types of heart failure.  First, in cardiac failure with preserved ejection fraction, the heart does not get the chance to relax, whereas in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction the heart can’t squeeze sufficiently, researchers described.

Enough treatments have been introduced to treat the latter one but there is no such scope of treatments for former.

“The rate of 5-year survival among cardiac failure with preserved ejection fraction patient is around Thirty to forty percent,” said Ambarish Pandey, a cardiologist in Internal Medicine at UT Southwestern Medical Centre.

“When the cardiac failure with reduced ejection fraction survival has improved tremendously over the years, heart failure with preserved ejection fraction prognosis is also getting little changed,” said Pandey.

Cardiac failureResearchers collected data from 51,000 participants. Among them, 3,180 patients who developed heart failure already.

Of these, Thirty-nine percent are heart failure patients with preserved ejection fraction, Twenty-nine percent were heart failure patients with reduced ejection fraction, and thirty-two percent had not been classified.

The heart failure with preserved ejection fraction was Nineteen percent lower for those patients who exercised regularly at recommended level.

Similarly, BMI-Body Mass Index has an inverse relationship with the cardiac failure of preserved ejection fraction.

Higher BMI level is more associated with cardiac failure with preserved ejection fraction than with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction.

The study has been published in the American College of Cardiology Journal.

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